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Scher Named Divisional Dean

Professor Philip Scher of anthropology has been named Divisional Dean for Social Sciences. His three-year term begins July 1.

He succeeds Carol Stabile, who has served as interim dean since August 2016.

A committee of department heads and others recommended Scher to W. Andrew Marcus, Tykeson Dean of Arts and Sciences, who announced the appointment May 12.

Scher said he will strive to advance the university’s academic and educational objectives through the promotion of a strong, diverse and productive faculty.

“This campus has many excellent leaders among the faculty and administration and I am very excited to work with them to build on the university’s mission to create a strong and diverse faculty and student body, and to find innovative ways to allow our academic units to thrive and grow,” Scher said.

A member of the anthropology department since 2002, Scher currently serves as director of the folklore and public culture program. He served previously as the department’s director of undergraduate studies and graduate studies.

Scher studies folklore, public culture, new media and technology. In his role as director of folklore and public culture, he increased summer online course offerings, giving students flexibility in satisfying core requirements and increasing the program’s operating budget.

Scher has extensive university service, including membership on the Dean’s Advisory Council, Senate, Childcare Committee and experience as a college advisor.

The anthropology scholar is recognized by his peers as innovative in the field of heritage and national identity in Caribbean cultures. Scher has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Fulbright Senior Scholar Fellowship and a Wenner-Gren Foundation grant, and has been an excellent mentor for graduate students.



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