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New Faculty Profile: Courtney Cox, Assistant Professor, Indigenous, Race, and Ethnic Studies

Courtney Cox’s area of specialization is the study of identity, technology and globalization through sport. With a focus on the cultural, political, and economic effects of global sport, her current research focuses on girls and women competing in and covering basketball across the United States, Russia, Senegal, and France. She’s also interested in the world of advanced analytics in sport, and the ways in which this quantitative aspect of the game can be studied qualitatively through both critical discourse analysis and ethnography. From following the ways athletes and fans use Twitter, to analyzing branding strategies of women’s professional leagues, to tracing the history of a sport from its birth to its current status as a global phenomenon, she is fascinated with the ways sport offers new possibilities in which to conceptualize culture, economy, and technology. Courtney comes to the UO from the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, where she recently completed her Ph.D. Her previous education includes a Bachelor of Journalism from The University of Texas at Austin’s Moody College of Communication, an MA in Journalism from UT. Before her academic career, she worked for ESPN in Bristol, Connecticut and Austin, Texas (Longhorn Network). She also spent time at NPR-affiliate KPCC in Pasadena, California and with the WNBA’s Los Angeles Sparks.



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