Looking Eastward at the West side of Tykson Hall
About the College of Arts and Sciences

Events

Dec 1
Master of Science in Finance Information Session 8:00 a.m.

Join us for this 30-minute information session to learn about our 12-month STEM- and CFA-certified Master of Science in Finance program, potential career outcomes, real-world...
Master of Science in Finance Information Session
December 1
8:00–8:30 a.m.

Join us for this 30-minute information session to learn about our 12-month STEM- and CFA-certified Master of Science in Finance program, potential career outcomes, real-world investing experience, and our award-winning faculty. Take the first step toward your career in finance with us.

Dec 1
Let's Talk - Thursday 2-4PM 2:00 p.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Nikki Chery, who specializes in working with African American and Black students, at the Multicultural Center (EMU 109m) or click...
Let's Talk - Thursday 2-4PM
September 29–December 8
2:00–4:00 p.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Nikki Chery, who specializes in working with African American and Black students, at the Multicultural Center (EMU 109m) or click here:

https://zoom.us/j/96120855580

Let’s Talk is a service that provides easy access to free, informal, and confidential one-on-one consultation with a Counseling Services staff member. See our website for six additional Let’s Talk days/times offered throughout the week.

Let’s Talk is especially helpful for students who:

Have a specific concern and would like to consult with someone about it. Would like on-the-spot consultation rather than ongoing counseling. Would like to consult with a CS staff member about what actual therapy looks like. Would like to meet with one of our CS identity-based specialists. Have a concern about a friend or family member and would like some ideas about what to do.

How does Let’s Talk work?

Let’s Talk will be offered via Zoom and/or in satellite locations across campus. As a drop-in service, there is no need to schedule an appointment and no paperwork to be completed. Students are seen individually on a first-come, first-served basis at the times listed below. There may be a wait in the Zoom waiting room if the Let’s Talk staff member is meeting with another student. Please wait and we will be with you as soon as we can. Let’s Talk appointments are brief (usually between 15-30 minutes) and are meant to be used on an as-needed basis. 

Click here for Let's Talk - Thursday 2-4PM or see Nikki at the Multicultural Center (EMU 109m):

https://zoom.us/j/96120855580

 

 

 

Dec 1
"Understanding the Microbial History of the Pacific Islands: Insights on Human Adaptations to New Environments" 4:00 p.m.

The settlement of the Eastern Pacific (the “Polynesian triangle” from Hawaii to Rapa Nui to Aotearoa New Zealand) represents the last great phase of prehistoric human...
"Understanding the Microbial History of the Pacific Islands: Insights on Human Adaptations to New Environments"
December 1
4:00–5:00 p.m.
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

The settlement of the Eastern Pacific (the “Polynesian triangle” from Hawaii to Rapa Nui to Aotearoa New Zealand) represents the last great phase of prehistoric human exploration and expansion. Despite this incredible feat, we know incredibly little about immediate and long-term post-arrival impacts on human physiology and health. Arrival in unique locations with varied access to resources, new disease exposures, and altered diets likely resulted in differential adaptive strategies across distinct archipelagos.

A new method – assessing ancient oral microbiomes within calcified dental plaque (calculus) – can provide insights into how humans adapted to new environments. Here, we sequenced ancient DNA preserved within dental calculus from three different Pacific Island Nations (Palau, Tahiti, and Aotearoa) in concert with local collaborators and communities. Distinct oral microbial communities were linked to the arrival in Central-East Polynesia, as well as settlement on individual archipelagos (i.e., in Tahiti), suggesting that settling in new locations may have altered microbes within these Ancestors. A key oral species within the Anaerolineaceae family also corroborated large-scale patterns of human migration, suggesting that these microbial signatures can potentially be leveraged to identify Pacific Islander Ancestors with minimally destructive sampling approaches. Overall, our work reveals how microbial signatures in Ancestors can illuminate novel insights into human adaptation to new environments.

Presentation by Dr. Laura Weyrich, associate professor of anthropology at Penn State University.

Dec 1
2023 University of Oregon Chinese Flagship Program Info Sessions 4:00 p.m.

The University of Oregon Chinese Flagship Program is a part of The Language Flagship, a national effort to change the way Americans learn languages through...
2023 University of Oregon Chinese Flagship Program Info Sessions
December 1
4:00–5:00 p.m.

The University of Oregon Chinese Flagship Program is a part of The Language Flagship, a national effort to change the way Americans learn languages through curricular innovation and intensive study abroad.

Since 2005, the University of Oregon Chinese Flagship Program has provided students with holistic academic advising and scholarship support to develop professional-level proficiency in Chinese while studying any academic major of their choice. Through our program, students become global professionals ready to change the world.

During these info sessions, the audience will learn about the program application, eligibility, academics, scholarships, study abroad opportunities, alumni career paths, and a Q&A, on Zoom!

 

Basic Application Requirement:

Must be a U.S. citizen or a permanent resident in the U.S. who is applying to UO as a degree-seeking undergraduate or is already enrolled at UO as a freshman or a sophomore

Dec 1
Celebrate Undergraduate Research Excellence Award Winners! 4:00 p.m.

Join us on December 1, 4–5 p.m., in the Knight Library Browsing Room, to celebrate Rowan Glass and Emily Kraschel, the first post-pandemic Libraries Award for Undergraduate...
Celebrate Undergraduate Research Excellence Award Winners!
December 1
4:00–5:00 p.m.
Knight Library Browsing Room, first floor of Knight Library, opposite the circulation desk.

Join us on December 1, 4–5 p.m., in the Knight Library Browsing Room, to celebrate Rowan Glass and Emily Kraschel, the first post-pandemic Libraries Award for Undergraduate Research Excellence (LAURE) winners! Emily’s award is for her undergraduate thesis project,  “Investigating Variations in Unemployment Between North and South Spain and Associated Implications.” And Rowan's is for his undergraduate research project,  “Colombian Counterpoint: Transculturation in the Sibundoy Valley Ethnohistory.” Please come and toast to the achievements of these two amazing undergraduate researchers and hear how collections, services, and librarians at UO Libraries supported their research.   Refreshments provided.  

Dec 1
6th Annual UO ©ritical A®t Show 6:30 p.m.

This is an art show that features art that borrows from media and culture to critique it. It's produced and curated by 20 first-year students in the Remixing Media, Critiquing...
6th Annual UO ©ritical A®t Show
December 1
6:30–10:00 p.m.
Global Scholars Hall Hall/Lobby by 123

This is an art show that features art that borrows from media and culture to critique it. It's produced and curated by 20 first-year students in the Remixing Media, Critiquing Culture FIG featuring art from students, faculty, and the community. 

Dec 1
9th Annual UO Hip Hop Jam 6:30 p.m.

This is a hip hop arts and culture party thrown by the Hip Hop & The Politics of Race FIG that celebrates hip hop culture: emceeing, dance, graffiti writing, DJing, and...
9th Annual UO Hip Hop Jam
December 1
6:30–10:00 p.m.
Global Scholars Hall 123 (Great Room)

This is a hip hop arts and culture party thrown by the Hip Hop & The Politics of Race FIG that celebrates hip hop culture: emceeing, dance, graffiti writing, DJing, and beatmaking. The Jam is organized by 20 first-year students, their FAs, and a faculty member.

This year we're featuring a talented line-up of Oregon-based artists (ePP, Sotaè, Justice Gbada, Spinitch, Kunu), Andrew Kai (a UO student), and hip hop dance/bboy/bgirl action from UO's Duck Street Dance Club and Flock Rock. The event will be hosted by K.I. Design and live painting from Tasko.

Dec 2
Human Physiology Seminar Series with Warren Alilain, PhD 10:00 a.m.

"The Two Gs of Personalized Medicine After Spinal Cord Injury: Genetics and the Gut Microbiome" Dr. Warren J. Alilain is an Associate Professor in the Department of...
Human Physiology Seminar Series with Warren Alilain, PhD
December 2
10:00 a.m.

"The Two Gs of Personalized Medicine After Spinal Cord Injury: Genetics and the Gut Microbiome"

Dr. Warren J. Alilain is an Associate Professor in the Department of Neuroscience at the University of Kentucky (UK) College of Medicine, and his laboratory is a part of the Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Center. He completed his undergraduate studies at the University of California at San Diego. Following this he was a research assistant at the Veterans Administration (VA) Medical Center in San Diego where he was first exposed to the fields of neurodegenerative diseases and spinal cord injury (SCI). For his graduate and postdoctoral work, he trained with the leading experts, Drs. Harry Goshgarian and Jerry Silver, and focused on rodent models of cervical SCI, the resulting respiratory motor deficits, and the therapeutic potential of plasticity and axonal regeneration.

Dr. Alilain has continued these lines of investigations in his own laboratory which he started in 2011 at MetroHealth Medical Center at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, Ohio. In 2015, he moved his laboratory to UK. In addition to cervical SCI, his research interests include neural plasticity in both injury and learning models, the therapeutic potential of stem cells, and functional electrical stimulation. Dr. Alilain’s approach towards exploring strategies to restore function after SCI is through first developing a pre-clinical animal model which closely reflects the human clinical population. This includes the use of cervical contusion injuries, chronic injured animals, and “humanized” rodents in order to develop personalized therapeutic interventions.

Over his career, Dr. Alilain has trained and supervised over 30 trainees ranging from high school students to clinical fellows. He is currently Director of Graduate Studies for the Department of Neuroscience. Dr. Alilain has reviewed for 20+ scientific journals and a number of federal and private funding agencies including the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, the VA, and the Department of Defense. He is currently a committee member on the Research Committee of the American Spinal Injury Association. Lastly, he founded and created an online SCI seminar series now known as the International Online SCI Research Seminars (@IOSCIRS):  www.ioscirs.com during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dec 2
“Embodied Ambiguity: Towards a Critical Phenomenology of Illness” noon

Sarah McLay, PhD candidate, Philosophy and 2022–23 OHC Dissertation Fellow. Please register to attend. My dissertation, exploring the relationship between bodies,...
“Embodied Ambiguity: Towards a Critical Phenomenology of Illness”
December 2
noon
Prince Lucien Campbell Hall (PLC) 159

Sarah McLay, PhD candidate, Philosophy and 2022–23 OHC Dissertation Fellow.

Please register to attend.

My dissertation, exploring the relationship between bodies, values, and society, offers a philosophical framework for making sense of the lived experience of illness. Working at the intersections of phenomenology and critical disability studies, I develop a critical phenomenology of illness; that is, a non-normate or crip analysis of ill bodies that moves beyond ableist frameworks of illness, health, healing, and life.

Dec 6
Let's Talk - Tuesday noon-2PM noon

Meet with Counseling Services Mariko Lin at the Center for Multicultural Academic Excellence (Oregon Hall-Room 130) or click here: https://zoom.us/j/99147472563 Let’s...
Let's Talk - Tuesday noon-2PM
September 27–December 6
noon

Meet with Counseling Services Mariko Lin at the Center for Multicultural Academic Excellence (Oregon Hall-Room 130) or click here: https://zoom.us/j/99147472563

Let’s Talk is a service that provides easy access to free, informal, and confidential one-on-one consultation with a Counseling Services staff member. See our website for six additional Let’s Talk days/times offered throughout the week.

Let’s Talk is especially helpful for students who:

Have a specific concern and would like to consult with someone about it. Would like on-the-spot consultation rather than ongoing counseling. Would like to consult with a CS staff member about what actual therapy looks like. Would like to meet with one of our CS identity-based specialists. Have a concern about a friend or family member and would like some ideas about what to do.

How does Let’s Talk work?

Let’s Talk will be offered via Zoom and/or in satellite locations across campus. As a drop-in service, there is no need to schedule an appointment and no paperwork to be completed. Students are seen individually on a first-come, first-served basis at the times listed below. There may be a wait in the Zoom waiting room if the Let’s Talk staff member is meeting with another student. Please wait and we will be with you as soon as we can. Let’s Talk appointments are brief (usually between 15-30 minutes) and are meant to be used on an as-needed basis. 

Click here for Let's Talk – Tuesday noon 2PM or see Mariko at the Center for Multicultural Academic Excellence (Oregon Hall-Room 130):

https://zoom.us/j/99147472563